UTN News

GOVERNMENT FIGHTS TO RETAIN DEATH PENALTY

The Uganda government want the death penalty be retained on Uganda’s statutory law books. The Principal Legal advisor to government the Attorney General told the Legal and Parliamentary Affairs committee of Parliament that shelving the death penalty from Uganda’s statutory law books would require a constitutional review or referendum. The government position falls on the heels

of a private members bill presented on the flow of Parliament by lead petitioner Alice Alaso seeking the death penalty sentence be replaced with life imprisonment. AMBIANCE… The execution of Ugandans was in 1999 when one Sebaduka was executed with 27 others since then no execution has taken place, but the death penalty still remains on Uganda’s statutory law books. Following this last year Woman MP Alice Alaso presented a private members bill seeking the shelving of death penalty from Uganda’s statutory law books and be replaced by life imprisonment.

However, appearing before the Legal and Parliamentary Affairs committee of Parliament, the Principal Legal Advisor to government, the Attorney General Fred Ruhindi told the committee that government is bent on the retention of the death penalty on Uganda’s statutory law books. DAVID HARMSON OBUA-COMMITTEE MEMBER FRED RUHINDI-GOV’T ATTORNEY GENERAL

The retention of the death penalty on Uganda’s statutory law books contravenes many international human rights treaties to which Uganda is a signatory to, but even with this, the Attorney General says that Uganda makes laws to suit the society her people lives in. FRED RUHINDI-GOV’T ATTORNEY GENERAL Apparently the Uganda Law Reform Commission has come up with a report on the subject matter seeking to have a holistic approach to the controversies surrounding the death penalty issue. FRED RUHINDI-GOV’T ATTORNEY GENERAL

However, the attorney general was quick to say that he has not carried out research to establish whether the presence of the death penalty on Uganda’s statutory law books and other countries that still embrace it, has deterred people from committing the rarest of the rare crimes. FRED RUHINDI-GOV’T ATTORNEY GENERAL

But the attorney general warned committee members that any attempt to shelve the death penalty would call for a scot free walk of criminals of aggravated defilement who are supposed to face the death penalty sentence. FRED RUHINDI-GOV’T ATTORNEY GENERAL